Summer 2024 Coaching Groups Start July 11th!
Only $1199 when you register by June 19th!

Learn more
episode info

Show Notes

Join the ADHD reWired Team every second Tuesday of the month for our monthly Live Q&A!  

You’ll hear strategies for communicating the challenges of ADHD to partners and families, ways to discuss invisible disabilities and other mental health challenges with others, resources for folks who don’t have access to healthcare, and three assumptions that can help reframe how we are in our relationships.

Then, you’ll hear techniques about learning and retaining information, ways that parents can help an adult child who is transitioning from graduating college to moving out into the world, and the importance of encouragement.  The panelists also talk about imposter syndrome, compassionate ass-kicking, that failure is not terminal, and how to support someone to get started on something tough.

Finally, you will hear the gold standard of diagnoses, comorbidities, and the importance of not getting wrapped up in a diagnosis.


Some of the Questions & Topics in this Episode:

  • How do I help my spouse learn about ADHD?  He is skeptical of the condition.
  • Could ADHD coaching be helpful for couples where one person has ADHD, and the other is neurotypical?
  • In the scenario where you come from a background where the concept of mental illness or ADHD is not necessarily “accepted”, how do you explain the guardrails or things that may be helpful for a child with ADHD to those who think, “Everyone is a little bit ADHD”?
  • People I know don’t have access to healthcare, medical support, or therapy.  But, I don’t know what to tell them when they’re struggling and don’t have access to the above.  Do you have any advice?
  • What can I do to manage my ADHD symptoms when I don’t have access to healthcare?
  • Do you have any tips, tricks, tools or techniques so I can actually retain information so that I’m learning it? It’s already stuff I know, but I feel like I am just reviewing stuff and I don’t actually get anywhere.
  • As a mother of a recent college graduate who does not want to treat his ADHD, he doesn’t want help from us and is overwhelmed about his future, and it’s hard to sit back and not do anything for him.
  • I have been treated for ADHD since I found out 20 years ago, but now, neuro health says I have no ADHD and “1000% Asperger’s.”  I am confused and immobilized.

Resources & Honorable Mentions:


Bonus: 

Last month, a listener asked if there were grants available to cover potential business expenses, specifically for ADHD.  Here are some resources they shared (Thank you Lili!)

Show Notes

Join the ADHD reWired Team every second Tuesday of the month for our monthly Live Q&A!  

You’ll hear strategies for communicating the challenges of ADHD to partners and families, ways to discuss invisible disabilities and other mental health challenges with others, resources for folks who don’t have access to healthcare, and three assumptions that can help reframe how we are in our relationships.

Then, you’ll hear techniques about learning and retaining information, ways that parents can help an adult child who is transitioning from graduating college to moving out into the world, and the importance of encouragement.  The panelists also talk about imposter syndrome, compassionate ass-kicking, that failure is not terminal, and how to support someone to get started on something tough.

Finally, you will hear the gold standard of diagnoses, comorbidities, and the importance of not getting wrapped up in a diagnosis.


Some of the Questions & Topics in this Episode:

  • How do I help my spouse learn about ADHD?  He is skeptical of the condition.
  • Could ADHD coaching be helpful for couples where one person has ADHD, and the other is neurotypical?
  • In the scenario where you come from a background where the concept of mental illness or ADHD is not necessarily “accepted”, how do you explain the guardrails or things that may be helpful for a child with ADHD to those who think, “Everyone is a little bit ADHD”?
  • People I know don’t have access to healthcare, medical support, or therapy.  But, I don’t know what to tell them when they’re struggling and don’t have access to the above.  Do you have any advice?
  • What can I do to manage my ADHD symptoms when I don’t have access to healthcare?
  • Do you have any tips, tricks, tools or techniques so I can actually retain information so that I’m learning it? It’s already stuff I know, but I feel like I am just reviewing stuff and I don’t actually get anywhere.
  • As a mother of a recent college graduate who does not want to treat his ADHD, he doesn’t want help from us and is overwhelmed about his future, and it’s hard to sit back and not do anything for him.
  • I have been treated for ADHD since I found out 20 years ago, but now, neuro health says I have no ADHD and “1000% Asperger’s.”  I am confused and immobilized.

Resources & Honorable Mentions:


Bonus: 

Last month, a listener asked if there were grants available to cover potential business expenses, specifically for ADHD.  Here are some resources they shared (Thank you Lili!)

speak up!

Want to be a guest on the podcast?

Share your story with our audience! Join Eric on the ADHD reWired podcast, and inspire others by talking about your experiences with ADHD. Help other ADHDers to learn and feel understood—every person's story adds to the strength of the ADHD community.

Schedule your 15-minute pre-interview now!

schedule now!
Patreon

Want to get ad-free podcast episodes?

Join ADHD reWired's Patreon and get your very own ad-free podcast feed for only $5 a month!

Other tiers of support can participate in monthly group coaching calls with Eric Tivers!

patreon page
Group coaching

Interested in group coaching for adults with ADHD?

ADHD reWired Coaching & Accountability Groups start 4 times per year. Registration is by invitation only—get invited by joining our interest list. Visit coachingrewired.com to learn more!

Learn more about coaching Join our coaching interest list

Looking for Adult Study Hall?

Find accountability here